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Several workshops on a variety of EC-related topics will be held during GECCO-2005. See this site for the latest list of topics and scheduling information. If you have any general questions, please contact the workshop chair Franz Rothlauf

Workshops and Tutorials Schedule (PDF)

WORKSHOP SCHEDULES
Ask the Consultant Workshop
Dave Davis

[Summary] [Further details]
 
Fourth annual workshop on Biological Applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation (BioGEC)
Jason H. Moore and Marylyn DeRiggi Ritchie


[Summary] [Further details]
 
Coevolution Discussion Forum (What Can Coevolution Do for Us? A Problem-Oriented View)
Anthony Bucci, Edwin deJong, R. Paul Wiegand



[Summary] [Further details]
 
Evolutionary Algorithms for Dynamic Optimization Problems
Shengxiang Yang and Juergen Branke


[Summary] [Further details]

schedule

Eighth International Workshop on Learning Classifier Systems (IWLCS-2005)
Tim Kovacs, Xavier Llorà, Keiki Takadama



[Summary] [Further details]
schedule PDF
(Latest version,
June 22nd.)
DOC version
Medical Applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation (MedGEC)
Stephen L. Smith and Stefano Cagnoni


[Summary] [Further details]
schedule
Second Workshop on Military and Security Applications of Evolutionary Computation
Stephen C. Upton, Laurence D. Merkle, Misty Blowers



[Summary] [Further details]
schedule
Optimization by Building and Using Probabilistic Models (OBUPM-2005) 
Jörn Grahl, Martin Pelikan, Kumara Sastry



[Summary] [Further details]
schedule
Parameter setting in Genetic and Evolutionary Algorithms
Fernando Lobo and Claudio F. Lima


[Summary] [Further details]
schedule
Scalable, Evolvable, Emergent Design and Developmental Systems (SEEDS)
Gregory Hornby, Sanjeev Kumar, Julian Miller



[Summary] [Further details]
 
Second Workshop On Self-Organization In Representations For Evolutionary Algorithms: Building complexity from simplicity
Ivan I. Garibay, Sanjeev Kumar, Ozlem Garibay, Hal Stringer




[Summary] [Further details]
 
Theory of Representations
Marc Toussaint, Alden H. Wright, Edwin D. de Jong



[Summary] [Further details]
schedule
Undergraduate Student Workshop
Laurence D. Merkle

Call for Papers txt file
  PDF file
  Word file

[Summary] [Further details]
 

Graduate Student Workshop
Michael O'Neill


[Summary] [Further details]

schedule

 

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Ask the Consultant Workshop
Dave Davis


This workshop is a chance for industrial GECCO attendees to get free consulting! The workshop will feature interactions between industrial participants and experienced evolutionary computation consultants. In each interaction, the industrial participant will present a problem that, if solved, would strongly impact business profits or work processes. Following this presentation, the experts will give their reactions to the problem, including comments on these topics:  

· What techniques might be good for solving this problem?
· Is it realistic to consider evolutionary computation as a solution technique?
· What might be the benefits from solving the problem?
· What similar problems have been solved successfully in the past?

The panel of experts is currently scheduled to include David Davis, of NuTech Solutions; Darrell Whitley, of Colorado State University; Mark Jakiela, of Washington University; and Rajkumar Roy, of Cranfield University. Each of these panel members has extensive experience in designing and managing real-world evolutionary computation applications. Depending on the nature of the problems presented, a subset of these consultants may be used to respond to particular presentations.

Industrial participants who would like to interact with the consultants during this workshop are encouraged to send email in advance to describing the type of problem they would like to discuss with the panel.



Eighth International Workshop on Learning Classifier Systems (IWLCS-2005)
Tim Kovacs, Xavier Llorà, Keiki Takadama
http://www.learning-classifier-systems.org/Activities/IWLCS.html

The goal is to discuss the recent developments in Learning Classifier Systems (LCS) research and the expected trends of the field. LCSs were introduced by John Holland (1978) as a method of learning by interacting with an environment, based on a biological metaphor: learning is viewed as a process of ongoing adaptation of an agent to an initially unknown environment. For a long time the LCS paradigm has been considered limited to the evolutionary computation community and their applications were limited to well-defined fields, e.g. robotics. The recent developments in the field of reinforcement learning have brought new attention to the LCS paradigm, which has been shown to be an interesting alternative to traditional reinforcement learning techniques. Furthermore, LCSs can be competitive in more general contexts like: autonomous agents, classification, trading agents, and personal assistants. Because of these new developments it is important to bring together people from this field to get an overview of the latest results and most promising research directions.
 

The main topics addressed in the workshop are: (a) theoretical advances in LCS, (b) systems and frameworks, (c) current challenges, and (d) application areas.

 


Second Workshop On Self-Organization In Representations For Evolutionary Algorithms: Building complexity from simplicity
Ivan I. Garibay, Sanjeev Kumar, Ozlem Garibay, Hal Stringer
http://ivan.research.ucf.edu/SOEA-2005.htm

Summary:
The success of Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) on a wide range of otherwise intractable problems has promoted its use. As EAs are applied to increasingly difficult problems that require increasingly complex solutions, they face a number of problems: premature convergence to suboptimal solutions, stagnation of search in large search spaces, negative epistatic effects, disruption of large building blocks, and scalability, among others. Nature evolves instructions in the form of genes that are used to specify the construction of organisms using a highly non-linear process: development.
Self-organization is fundamental to the developmental process at all levels: molecular, genetic, and cellular. With new reports of the number of genes in the human genome being revised downwards, the role< of self-organization in complex webs of gene regulation is all the more salient. Given these new findings, perhaps the self-organization of genotypic instructions that transform genotype to phenotype is a key missing ingredient necessary for unleashing the evolution of complex and scalable solutions with emergent phenomena such as: scale-free-ness, adaptability, innovation, evolvability, and robustness.This workshop will focus on domain-independent methods for representing complex solutions with self-organizable building blocks, and on developmental principles for specifying the construction of complex systems. The workshop welcomes submissions from biologists on relevant biology that may help shed more light on self-organizing principles for evolutionary computation.


Topics of interest include:

* Models of complexity building using self-organization
* Emergent behavior in representations
* Methods of design and evaluation of self-organizable representational
building blocks
* Scalability of self-organizational processes to high complexities
* Self-organization theoretical approaches: complexity, chaos, synergetics,
self-organized criticality, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, etc.
* Self-organized development
* Genotype-phenotype mappings for self-organization and single & multicellular
development
* Pattern formation, morphogenesis, cellular differentiation, and growth
* Models of genetic regulatory networks, modularity, segmentation, and
compartmentalization
* Scalability & Evolvability of developmental processes
* Robustness, self-repair and regeneration in developmental processes
* Real world applications of developmental principles


Theory of Representations
Marc Toussaint, Alden H. Wright, Edwin D. de Jong
http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/mtoussai/gecco05/

The choice of representation crucially determines the performance of a heuristic search process. We believe that there have been very interesting new ideas and approaches on the subject of learning representations recently. However, a unifying point of view is currently missing and the different approaches are widely scattered in the literature with too little cross-fertilization. In this workshop we would like to gather such work and, in a discussion between the contributors from the various lines of research, fuse the various approaches and formalisms into a common framework. This framework might clarify what the scope of a theory of representations should be, what existing algorithms may be considered as cases of representation adaptation, and how the existing literature on the topic can be integrated in a broader picture -- thereby also seeking contact with related areas in Computer Science and Machine Learning.


Undergraduate Student Workshop
Laurence D. Merkle
http://ugws2005.cs.rose-hulman.edu/index.shtml

Call for Papers txt file
  PDF file
  Word file


The third annual Undergraduate Student Workshop at a GECCO conference will occur on June 25, 2005 in Washington, D.C. The workshop will provide an opportunity for undergraduate students, and their faculty mentors, to present evolutionary computation projects they have completed as class projects or in conjunction with more in-depth undergraduate research activities.

The workshop will be a half-day event, during which approximately eight undergraduate students will present their work to a panel of GECCO participants interested in undergraduate education. The panel will also include participating students' faculty mentors. Students should plan on 15-minute presentations, followed by five minutes of questions. The panel will provide feedback to the presenting students regarding their work and their presentation.

Students invited to the workshop will also participate in the conference poster session. Students will display posters summarizing their work; this will allow the larger GECCO community to see what's being done by undergraduates in evolutionary computation. The poster session will also be a great opportunity for some networking!

Goals of the Undergraduate Student Workshop include:

(*) To provide a forum allowing undergraduate students to put a " capstone" on their undergraduate research activities, by presenting their work at an international conference

(*) To encourage teaching faculty to consider undergraduate research opportunities for their students in the EC field

(*) To help prepare undergraduate students for graduate work in EC areas

(*) To encourage sharing and networking amongst teaching faculty with students participating in undergraduate research projects in EC

(*) To provide networking opportunities for graduate school faculty and undergraduate students interested in pursuing advanced degrees, and

(*) To encourage more emphasis on education at the GECCO conference


Call for Workshops Proposals - Deadline was on October 29, 2004


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